Archive for March, 2010

Budget Update, 2009-2010

Wednesday, March 31st, 2010

Often you hear from me about what is anticipated in the budget reduction context.  I wanted you all to know that we have come full circle in completing our reduction commitments to the campus.  We have transferred $1.83 million that covers the 5% permanent reduction in our baseline budget and the $1.09 million that was required from our furlough and salary reduction targets for this year.  We were able to meet these targets through the incredible support and sacrifice of every staff person at the UCLA Library.  Each of you made a contribution to how we met the challenge.  I know it has been difficult.  I sincerely thank each of you for helping make this happen.  In the process we have preserved jobs, maintained our services, and continued to build our collections.  Our next task now is to reconstruct our baseline budget and to move forward.  Together we will continue to make progress and build a solid future for the UCLA Library.

Again, my sincere thanks.

Research Library Renovation (3)

Sunday, March 21st, 2010

The contractor has arrived and the first floor is being cleared  so that demolition can begin.

All of the previous casework must be taken down and removed.

All of the previous casework must be taken down and removed.

 

The computer commons comes down, but the cabling must be carefully handled.  Shelving will be dismantled, stored, and returned to the new Reference Room.

The computer commons comes down, but the cabling must be carefully handled. Shelving will be dismantled, stored, and returned to the new Reference Room.

 

One realizes just how large the spaces are when everything is removed.

One realizes just how large the spaces are when everything is removed.

The temporary wall that separated the reading room from staff areas will be demolished opening up even more space.

The temporary wall that separated the reading room from staff areas will be demolished opening up even more space.

 

The self check-out station has been relocated.  Circulation services will remain at its current location until its new space is completed about 6 months from now.

The self check-out station has been relocated. Circulation services will remain at its current location until its new space is completed about 6 months from now.

International Women’s Day Speaker

Sunday, March 21st, 2010

The Charles E. Young Research Library hosted renowned singer Susana Baca in honor of International Women’s Day, March 8th.  The presentation room filled to the brim with students, faculty, staff, and community members.  For the first time in the Library’s history, Afro-Peruvian rhythms and cadences infused our books with unforeseen vitality. 

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Susana Baca discussed the resilience of the American diaspora in Latin America, and especially, in Puru.  She made clear that cultural forms such as dance and music uplifted the spirit of her people despite subjugation. 

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The event was co-sponsored by the Library  with the Cesar Chavez Department of Chicano and Chicana Studies, The Chicano Research Center, the Center for the Study of Race, Ethnicity and Politics, the Latin American Institute, the World Arts and Cultures Department, the Gender and Interculturalities Working Group, MAALCS de UCLA (a student group), and Mujeres de Maiz (a community group).

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The Susana Baca presentation has been posted on the UCLA on YouTube channel:

 http://youtube.ucla.edu/

 The direct link to the video is http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rvG2-2QfUcA

UCLA Library Writer Series

Sunday, March 21st, 2010

The UCLA Library Writer Series inaugurated a new component this last year, detective fiction and the Central American Experience, bringing to a standing only room award winning journalist and writer Hector Tobar.  The series aims to bring to the UCLA community more awareness of Central American cultures and communities.

Marcos McPeek Villatoro screened a short film based on five women from El Mozote.  El Mozote is the name of the rural village of Morazan, El Salvador where a mass murder of many civilians took place.  A U.S. trained battalion–ironically named after Atlacati, the indigenous hero that fought against Spanish colonization–murdered men, women, and children accused of being members of a communist group.  One woman survived the ordeal.  The film recuperates part of this tragic history, but more important, shows the resilience and the strength of the women who were affected by it.  The event required additional rows of seating and mdae apparent the interest of this subject to the UCLA community and beyond.  We were honored to have been chosen as the site for the documentary’s screening that will make its world prmier showing at the Guadalajara International Film Festival next.

Kevin Mulroy, Villatoro, and Gloria Chacon

Kevin Mulroy, Villatoro, and Gloria Chacon

Marcos McPeek Villatoro is the author of five novels, two collections of poetry and a memoir. His Romilla Chacon crime fiction books have won national acclaim (named a Best Book of 2001 by the Los Angeles Times) and are also published in Germany, Japan, Russian, and Brazil.

Marcos holds the Fletcher Jones Endowed Chair in Writing at Mount St. Mary’s College.  He as performed on NPR and appears regularly on KCET, the PBS Television station in Los Angeles.  Recently he returned from his other home country of El Salvador, where he shot the documentary Tamale Road.

Marcos teaches and lectures on poetry, fiction, nonfiction, Latino and Appalachian worlds and tamales. His books are taught in colleges and high schools across the country.  Marcos, his wife, and four children live in Los Angeles.