Archive for January, 2008

Library of Congress photos on Flickr

Wednesday, January 30th, 2008

The Library of Congress has joined the social tagging scene, putting a selection of photos from its collections on Flickr.  Users are invited to view and tag the photos, which have no known copyright restrictions.  For more information about this project, see this recent entry in the Library of Congress Blog.  Currently, there are 1500 photos in a set called “News in the 1910s” and 1615 photos in a second set called “1930s and 1940s in Color.”

To the interdisciplinary lit scholars reading this

Tuesday, January 29th, 2008

Literature scholars aren’t typically associated with producing works on oral history.  However, some of us do and so I wanted to pass along this call for contributions to a new Oxford University Press series called The Oxford Oral History Series.

The Oxford Oral History Series will showcase the best of current work in oral history and aims to advance methodological and theoretical understandings of the field. It will be international and interdisciplinary in scope and will include volumes for academic, professional, and trade (general) audiences. 

We welcome proposals for a variety of projects, including:
● Subject-based collections of edited oral histories
● Methodological works that advance the practice, application, and analysis of oral history
● Theoretical works and thematic collections of interpretive essays that advance key concepts and frameworks in the field
● Narrative histories and oral history-based works from other disciplines that draw heavily on oral histories while simultaneously illuminating the method or theory of oral history.  

Please send a short e-mail query—short Word attachments are acceptable; no PDFs, please—or a request for more detailed submission guidelines to any of the following: 

SERIES EDITORS
J. Todd Moye
Director, Oral History Program
University of North Texas
moye at unt dot edu                                                    

Kathryn Nasstrom
Associate Professor of History
University of San Francisco
nasstromk at usfca dot edu  

Robert Perks
Curator of Oral History
The British Library Sound Archive
Rob dot Perks at bl dot uk

SENIOR ADVISOR
Donald A. Ritchie
Associate Historian
U.S. Senate Historical Office
oralhistorians at Comcast dot net 

OXFORD UNIVERSITY PRESS EDITOR
Nancy Toff
Vice President & Executive Editor
Oxford University Press
nancy dot toff at oup dot com

TRIAL SUBSCRIPTION: Oxford Islamic Studies

Monday, January 28th, 2008

During the month of February, UCLA has access to Oxford Islamic Studies, a database which contains literature-related resources. You may access it from any UCLA IP address (please note that it may not work via proxy server).  Let me know if you have trouble accessing it.  And if you do give it a try, please let me know what you think.

As usual, keep in mind that with a limited budget for electronic resources, the Library cannot purchase subscriptions to everything for which we get a trial.  That said, if I know that a resource will be of use to UCLA scholars, I will place it higher on the priority list.  Also keep in mind that for very expensive resources which are purchased at theUniversity of
California level, license negotiations may take up to a year or more.  Another reason to fight hard for open access resources…

Intellectual property workshops for faculty

Friday, January 25th, 2008

Faculty, don’t miss these valuable workshops!  Space is limited, so register soon.

Intellectual Property in the Digital Age:  The Rights Stuff for Teaching and Publishing

This 2007-08 lunchtime series for UCLA faculty is co-sponsored by the UCLA Library, Academic Senate, Academic Senate Committee on Library and Scholarly Communication, and the Office of Intellectual Property Administration. Admission is free, and lunch will be provided. Registration is limited to UCLA faculty; advance registration is required, and space is limited.

“Don’t I Own My Own Work?”: Negotiating to Keep Your Copyright

Thursday, February 7
Noon-1:30 p.m.
Young Research Library Presentation Room

As a UCLA faculty member, you must be productive in a “publish or perish” environment. But in your rush to publish, are you signing an agreement with your publisher without reading it fully or understanding its implications? You might unknowingly surrender your copyright and, along with it, the rights to use and reuse your work as you wish. Find out how to read authors’ agreements and how to negotiate to keep your rights. Learn from colleagues who have efficiently negotiated agreements without risk to their academic advancement.�
Register Online at: http://www2.library.ucla.edu/scholarly/copyright.html

“What Are My Rights?”: Software, Patents, and Open Source

Thursday, April 10
Noon-1:30 p.m.
Biomedical Library Classroom

In our networked information environment, UC faculty increasingly collaborate on and create projects and programs that include software and inventions. Come hear Kat Fibiger, copyright lawyer, software creator, and new member of the UCLA’s Office of Intellectual Property, describe UC policy related to these areas.

TRIAL SUBSCRIPTION: Literature Criticism Online

Wednesday, January 16th, 2008

Until February 28, 2008, UCLA has access to Literature Criticism Online. This database provides electronic access to most of the print content available in reference sources such as Contemporary Literary Criticism, Twentieth-Century Literary Criticism, Nineteenth-Century Literary Criticism, Literature Criticism from 1400-1800, Classical and Medieval Literature Criticism, Drama Criticism, Children’s Literature Review, and Shakespearean Criticism–all of which we currently own in our print reference collections at UCLA.  (By the way, if you haven’t used these valuable print resources, give them a try.  In Young Research Library, these sets are kept on low shelves near the back of the Reference Reading Room.  A reference librarian would be happy to give you a quick tour.)

Why are we even considering the online version if we have already paid for the print?  A couple reasons: 1. These very expensive print sets don’t see much use anymore, even though there is a wealth of very useful information in them. This may be our fault as librarians for not promoting the print materials vigorously enough, but it seems that many scholars are–increasingly, and for a variety of reasons–erring on the side of convenience (full-text, online) rather than comprehensiveness (hunting down every single useful resource they can find). 2. Space is always an issue in our libraries and these sets take up a great deal of space. If they are not seeing much use, it might be preferable to relocate them to the bookstacks or to our off-site storage facility and use that space for reference materials that are not available in electronic form. 3. There may be cost-savings involved in the long term by going to one digital resource rather than having duplicate sets of the print in two or more libraries on campus.

This trial requires a password, so contact me if you are interested and I’ll give you the password.  (I monitor all comments on this blog before posting them, so if you use the comment feature to request a password, I can respond to you without actually posting your comment/request to the blog.)  If you do give Literature Criticism Online a try, please let me know what you think.

As usual, keep in mind that with a limited budget for electronic resources, the Library cannot purchase subscriptions to everything for which we get a trial.  That said, if I know that a resource will be of use to UCLA scholars, I will place it higher on the priority list.  Also keep in mind that for very expensive resources which are purchased at the University of California level, license negotiations may take up to a year or more.  Another reason to fight hard for open access resources…

TRIAL SUBSCRIPTION: The Gilded Age

Wednesday, January 16th, 2008

Through March 14, 2008, UCLA has access to The Gilded Age, a database of primary documents and scholarly research pertaining to American history and culture, 1865-1902. You may access it from any UCLA IP address (please note that it may not work via proxy server).  If you give it a try, please let me know what you think.

As usual, keep in mind that with a limited budget for electronic resources, the Library cannot purchase subscriptions to everything for which we get a trial.  That said, if I know that a resource will be of use to UCLA scholars, I will place it higher on the priority list.  Also keep in mind that for very expensive resources which are purchased at the University of California level, license negotiations may take up to a year or more.  Another reason to fight hard for open access resources…

Winter 2008 library workshops for graduate students

Thursday, January 3rd, 2008

Grad students, don’t miss these upcoming research-related workshops!

Open Workshops for Graduate Students, Winter 2008
http://www.library.ucla.edu/yrl/workshops.html  

The Library offers graduate students helpful workshops on a variety of research-related topics. The workshops are open; no reservations are necessary, except for the Advanced EndNote session.

EndNote
This session offers a basic overview of the purpose, uses, and features of EndNote, a program that helps researchers manage references and produce bibliographies for projects large and small.

Research Library East Electronic Classroom, Second Floor
Ninety minutes - Tuesday, January 22: 2:00 p.m. 

Finding Journal Articles Online – Humanities Focus
Learn how to find the full text of articles online, how to discover the best databases for articles on a given topic, and how to use these resources effectively through online demonstration and hands-on instruction. This session focuses on humanities resources.

Research Library East Electronic Classroom, Second Floor
Fifty minutes - Wednesday, January 23: 10:00 a.m. 

Citation and Academic Integrity Issues
Common research and writing situations often present complex questions related to citation and paraphrasing. In support of maintaining academic integrity, this workshop will offer practical guidance for citing sources and using information ethically.

Student Activities Center, Conference Room 4 (basement level)
Two hours - Thursday, January 24, 3:00 p.m. 

There’s Something About Statistics…and Data at the UCLA Library
Join us for a workshop that will help you navigate through the sea of statistics and data.

Research Library East Electronic Classroom, Second Floor
Two hours - Wednesday, February 13, 3:00 p.m.  

Advanced EndNote
This hands-on session will offer an overview of some advanced EndNote techniques. Note: Session will emphasize EndNote X1 for Windows.

Research Library East Electronic Classroom, Second Floor
Ninety minutes - Wednesday, February 20th, 2:00 p.m.
RSVP, space limited to 16. Please send an email to ahaymon@library.ucla.edu, with the subject heading “RSVP Advanced EndNote.”