Archive for October, 2007

DISSERTATION FUNDING: Mellon Fellowships for Dissertation Research in Original Sources

Tuesday, October 30th, 2007

The Council on Library and Information Resources is offering funding for graduate students writing dissertations based on research in original sources.  There is more information on the CLIR site: www.clir.org/fellowships/mellon/mellon.html.

TRIAL SUBSCRIPTION: Medieval Travel Writing Online

Tuesday, October 30th, 2007

During the month of November, UCLA has access to Medieval Travel Writing Online. You may access it from any UCLA IP address (please note that it may not work via proxy server).  If you give it a try, please let me know what you think. 

As usual, keep in mind that with a limited budget for electronic resources, the Library cannot purchase subscriptions to everything for which we get a trial.  That said, if I know that a resource will be of use to UCLA scholars, I will place it higher on the priority list.  Also keep in mind that for very expensive resources which are purchased at the University of California level, license negotiations may take up to a year or more.  Another reason to fight hard for open access resources…

Call for Papers—Special Issue of Electronic Journal of Communication

Wednesday, October 10th, 2007

Of special interest to interdisciplinary scholars:

Call for Papers—Special Issue of Electronic Journal of Communication
Irony and Politics: User-Producers, Parody, and Digital Publics
Deadline: November 10, 2007
EJC call for papers
http://www.cios.org/www/ejc/calls/bolergourneloscfp.htm

Irony as a cultural form has two main requirements: first, that there is a shared social language, and second that the shared language can and should be violated for the purposes of socio-cultural evolution.  Irony is therefore posed almost always in distinction (if not direct opposition) to dominant rhetoric, discourse, and politics.  This is not, as theorists such as Linda Hutcheon have reminded us, always a progressive or emancipatory shift, but it does reframe language and community outside of accepted pathways of behavior.  Although commodity and advertising corporations have co-opted irony as a tactic of capital, it has retained the ability to become the focus and reason for controversy and (potentially subversive) subculture identities, particularly as internet communities such as YouTube and MySpace have flourished.  This special issue will chart instances of irony throughout the past few years of U.S. media culture, specifically with an eye to: (a) how irony, political satire, and parody have been popularized particularly as forms of expression in the wake of political repression since September 11, 2001; and (b) how the web-based convergence of traditional print and broadcast with digital media help crystallize oppositional discussion and new digital publics based on the fragmentation and reframing of discourses with an intent to change the political landscape.  Drawing from but providing crucial new elements to the work of theorists such as Guy Debord, Raymond Williams, Gilles Deleuze, Claire Colebrook, Manuel Castells, and Michel de Certeau we seek locations in which old and new media collide in order to form emergent, nomadic communities that rely on the shared and shifting language of irony. We encourage the submission of a broad variety of theoretical and methodological approaches, including historical analyses, literature reviews, and ethnographic studies.  “New media” should be understood broadly as both internet-based media (including the community and interactive functions of Web 2.0) and the connections between such media and more residual forms of communication such as newspapers, comic strips, and lectures (Stephen Colbert’s appearance at the 2006 White House Correspondent’s Dinner being one of the best known examples). Possible topics include:
Flash Animation
Blogs
Vice Magazine
The Onion
Michael Moore
South Park
The Simpsons
YouTube
MySpace
The Daily Show
The Colbert Report
The Chappelle Show
Political Cartoons
The Boondocks

The special issue is scheduled for publication in July 2008. Deadline for completed manuscripts November 10, 2007. Submissions should be electronic (.doc or .rtf format only) and should follow MLA formatting guidelines; mss. length from 5000-7500 words . Authors should take care to include images only when they do not violate intellectual property guidelines, and are responsible for gaining permission for image use.  Inquiries about possible topics are welcome. Submissions and inquiries should be directed to:

Megan Boler                                        Ted Gournelos
University of Toronto                               University of Illinois
mboler@oise.utoronto.ca                             gournelo@uiuc.edu

ARTstor demonstration for faculty and grad students

Tuesday, October 9th, 2007

Are you using visual images in your scholarship? Don’t miss this upcoming demonstration of ARTstor, an innovative database of electronic images. This demonstration is geared toward faculty and graduate students. See the informational flyer pasted here:

Did you know that over half a million high-quality digital images are currently available to UCLA in a searchable database? Thanks to initial funding from the UC Libraries and CDL (the California Digital Library), every UC campus now has access to ARTstor and the ability to share images!

What is ARTstor?  

ARTstor is a digital library containing nearly 550,000 images in the areas of art, architecture, humanities and social sciences.  Thousands of additional images covering a wide range of cultures and time periods are added each month. 

How Can I Find Out More?   Friday October 19, 2007  1:00 – 2:30 PM  West Electronic Classroom, Young Research Library (2nd floor)
RSVP: 310-206-4587 or jhenri@library.ucla.edu 

In this 90-minute demonstration, representatives from ARTstor and the California Digital Library will highlight how ARTstor’s content, tools and services can help meet curricular needs:

§         Finding, zooming, comparing images

§         Downloading images and details

§         Adding your own images to a Personal Collection

§         Saving groups of images and collaborating with students online

§         Integrating with course management systems

§         Creating presentations using ARTstor’s Offline Image Viewer or PowerPoint

If you have questions about the presentation or using ARTstor images for teaching, please feel free to contact: Janine Henri, Architecture, Design, and Digital Services Librarian, Arts Library, jhenri@library.ucla.edu, 310-206-4587.

Who Should Attend?

The ARTstor Digital Library is useful for librarians, educators, scholars and students in a wide variety of disciplines. This includes historians of art and architecture and others engaged in the visual arts, as well as individuals in fields as diverse as American Studies, Anthropology, Archeology, Asian Studies, Classical Studies, Design, Literary Studies, Medieval Studies, Middle Eastern Studies, Music, Religious Studies, Renaissance Studies, Theater & Dance, and Women’s Studies, all of whom find the images in ARTstor to be relevant to their teaching and research.  

If you are already familiar with ARTstor, please join us to learn what’s new!

TRIAL: Feedback on multidisciplinary databases

Monday, October 8th, 2007

The UC Libraries are soliciting feedback from faculty and students on three multidisciplinary databases intended for undergraduate use.  Trials of these three databases–Academic Search Premier, Academic Search Complete, and Academic OneFile–are available from any UCLA IP address through the end of October. Once you have looked at the databases, send in your feedback to the library at the UCLA Library website.  For more information about this trial, click here.

TRIAL SUBSCRIPTION: Oxford Language Dictionaries Online

Thursday, October 4th, 2007

During the month of October, UCLA has access to the Oxford Language Dictionaries Online. You may access it from any UCLA IP address (please note that it may not work via proxy server).  If you give it a try, please let me know what you think. 

As usual, keep in mind that with a limited budget for electronic resources, the Library cannot purchase subscriptions to everything for which we get a trial.  That said, if I know that a resource will be of use to UCLA scholars, I will place it higher on the priority list.  Also keep in mind that for very expensive resources which are purchased at the University of California level, license negotiations may take up to a year or more.  Another reason to fight hard for open access resources…

TRIAL SUBSCRIPTION: Irish Women Poets of the Romantic Period

Wednesday, October 3rd, 2007

For a limited time, UCLA has access to Alexander Street Press’s new database, “Irish Women Poets of the Romantic Period.” You may access it from any UCLA IP address (please note that it may not work via proxy server).  If you give it a try, please let me know what you think. 

As usual, keep in mind that with a limited budget for electronic resources, I cannot purchase subscriptions to everything for which we get a trial.  That said, if I know that a resource will be of use to UCLA scholars, I will place it higher on the priority list.  Also keep in mind that for very expensive resources which are purchased at the University of California level, license negotiations may take up to a year or more.  Another reason to fight hard for open access resources…

Chaucer Bibliography Online

Wednesday, October 3rd, 2007

The Chaucer Bibliography Online, produced by The University of Texas at San Antonio Library and The New Chaucer Society, is freely available on the web and will soon be accessible from the UCLA Library’s electronic resources pages.  This bibliography gives you access to citations only, so do not come to it expecting full-text articles.