Archive for the ‘UCLA Hammer’ Category

the weekend of September 28 – October 1, 2012

Tuesday, August 7th, 2012

To all UCLA Bruins, a message from Renée A. Fortier, Executive Director of Events and Transportation

As part of the ongoing project to improve the I-405 Freeway, the second complete closure of all northbound and southbound lanes of the I-405 between the I-10 and US 101 will occur during the weekend of September 28-October 1, 2012. On Friday, September 28, ramps along the 10-mile closure area will begin to shut down as early as 7 p.m., and closure of individual freeway lanes will begin at 10 p.m. to ensure full freeway closure by midnight. The closure is scheduled to continue until 5 a.m. Monday morning, October 1. Ramps and connectors will be reopened by 6 a.m. During this closure, the Mulholland Bridge, I-405 Freeway and access ramps will be closed as contractors demolish the remaining side of the Mulholland Bridge.

Metro, Caltrans, Los Angeles Police Department, Los Angeles Fire Department, California Highway Patrol, and Los Angeles Department of Transportation are asking the public to avoid the area during the closure. Motorists who must travel through this area during this weekend are advised to plan ahead, monitor real-time traffic conditions prior to beginning their trips and use alternate routes or public transit.

Because last summer’s “Carmageddon Part I” went well and finished early, more motorists may now be tempted to drive and ignore the warnings of severe traffic congestion and delays from transportation and law enforcement officials. This time, the contractor is unlikely to complete the work early as the scope of the work is larger, with more to tear down and remove within the same 53-hour period. This particular weekend is also the first weekend of the beginning of UCLA’s academic year. While it is not the most desirable weekend, UCLA was not the decision maker in the scheduling and we were successful in pushing the timeframe away from student move-in weekend which occurs one week prior.

It is advised that you take these traffic impacts of the I-405 closures into serious consideration and avoid scheduling any events during the closure weekend. If you expect to have employees, students, patients or other visitors traveling to or from the UCLA campus or Santa Monica Hospital during that weekend, please advise them to expect significant delays and include additional travel time in their schedules.

As the closure weekend approaches, UCLA Events & Transportation will provide additional information, including any designated detour routes and the times and locations of specific ramp closures. General information on the I-405 Sepulveda Pass Improvements Project and associated traffic impacts can be found at http://www.metro.net/projects/I-405. UCLA Events & Transportation will also provide updates at http://www.beagreencommuter.com/?tag=carmageddon-ii as more information becomes available.

If you have any questions, please contact Matthew Hissom, Senior Transportation Planner, at 310-825-7835.

Family Flicks

Monday, June 25th, 2012

UCLA Film and Television Archive and the Hammer Museum present family flicks and they are free!

Next up: My Friend Flicka, July 22, 2012 at 11:00 a.m.

Billy Wilder Theater

Free!

Considered immature and irresponsible by his rancher father, young Ken dreams of having his own horse. He is ultimately entrusted with a chestnut filly he names Flicka but the responsibilities of caring for the animal puts Ken quickly to the test, especially when Flicka becomes gravely injured.

Click here for directions.

Click here for the calendar of events.

 

Cheeseheads!

Tuesday, June 12th, 2012

‘We are Wisconsin!’

Tuesday, June 19, 2012
7:30 pm – 9:30 pm
UCLA Hammer Museum – Billy Wilder Theater

Documenting the public outcry against Wisconsin governor Scott Walker’s controversial 2011 budget-repair bill, ‘We Are Wisconsin!’ focuses on the human story behind a remarkable popular uprising forged on the floor of the Madison Capitol.

The film asks the question “why should we care about what’s going on in Wisconsin?” through an in-depth profile of six protesters—a UW-Madison student leader, a county social worker, a nurse, a high school teacher, a police officer, and a union electrician.

All Hammer public programs are free. Hammer members receive priority seating, subject to availability.

Reservations not accepted, RSVPs not required.

Parking is available under the museum for $3 after 6:00pm.

Free and open to the public.

 

An Evening with Sherlock Holmes and Friends

Tuesday, May 22nd, 2012

Tuesday, May 22, 2012
7:00 pm – 9:00 pm
UCLA Hammer Museum

Holmes scholar Leslie Klinger, writer/director Nicholas Meyer (The Seven-Per-Cent Solution), crime novelist Denise Hamilton, and real-life private detective Sarah Alcorn contribute their expertise to deducing why Conan Doyle’s character has inspired such enduring intrigue and devotion. Costumes welcome. Budding mystery writers especially encouraged.

Complimentary coffee and tea served.

All Hammer public programs are free. Hammer members receive priority seating, subject to availability. Reservations not accepted, RSVPs not required.

Parking is available under the museum for $3 after 6:00pm.

 

Nato Thompson

Tuesday, March 20th, 2012

Wednesday, March 21, 2012
7:00 pm – 9:00 pm

UCLA Hammer Museum

Nato Thompson, chief curator at Creative Time in New York and author of the forthcoming Seeing Power: Art and Activism in the Age of Cultural Production, discusses how to find one’s voice and make change in a world flooded with information and images. From cooperative housing to anarchist infoshops to alternative art venues, Thompson shows that many of today’s most innovative spaces operate as sites of dramatic personal transformation.

Free and open to the public.

Parking is available under the museum for $3 after 6:00pm.

 

Keorapetse Kgositsile

Friday, March 16th, 2012

Thursday, March 22, 2012
7:00 pm – 9:00 pm, UCLA Hammer Museum

Keorapetse Kgositsile is a South African poet and activist, and was an influential member of the African National Congress in the 1960s and 1970s.

One of the most significant poets in the Pan-African movement, he was also the founder of the Black Arts Theater in Harlem. He is the author of If I Could Sing, To the Bitter End, When the Clouds Clear, and The Word Is Here. He was South Africa’s National Poet Laureate in 2006.

Complimentary coffee and tea served.

A book signing will follow the reading.

POETRY This series of readings is organized and hosted by Stephen Yenser, poet and professor at UCLA and author of A Boundless Field: American Poetry at Large and Blue Guide.

ALL HAMMER PUBLIC PROGRAMS ARE FREE. Seating is on a first come, first served basis. Hammer members receive priority seating, subject to availability. Reservations not accepted, RSVPs not required.

Parking is available under the museum for $3 after 6:00pm.

Admission is free and open to the public.

Al-Mutanabbi Street: Poetry and Art from Tragedy

Wednesday, March 14th, 2012

March 5-April 30, 2012

Powell Library Rotunda

Known as “the street of booksellers,” al-Mutanabbi Street is a legendary locale in Baghdad, a winding lane filled with bookstores, outdoor book stalls, small presses, and cafes where books have been made, sold, and discussed for centuries. In March 2007 a massive car bomb targeted this historic heart of the city’s intellectual and literary community, leaving thirty dead and one hundred injured.

The broadsides and artists’ books by poets, writers, artists, booksellers, printers, and readers in this exhibit commemorate not just the tragic loss of life, but also the idea of a targeted attack on a street where ideas have always been exchanged. The exhibit is presented in partnership with the UCLA G. E. von Grunebaum Center for Near Eastern Studies and with support from the Dean of Humanities Fund.

Free and open to the public.

The rotunda is on the second floor of the Powell Library Building, which is directly across from Royce Hall. Parking is $11; the closest parking is in structures four, two, or five. See the UCLA maps and directions page for more information.

Open letter to the UC community from President Yudof

Saturday, March 10th, 2012

I write today to address, once again, the moral and ethical imperative for all of our University of California students, faculty and staff members to foster a climate of tolerance, civility and open-mindedness. I am prompted to do so because of a number of recent incidents that undermine this imperative.

University campuses are proper venues for collisions of ideas and viewpoints. Conflicting viewpoints not only are inevitable but also healthy in this context.

What is not acceptable are acts meant to disrupt the speech of others. What is not acceptable are hate-driven physical and, yes, verbal attacks on any group or individual that are meant to silence or intimidate those who would express differing opinions.

It was wrong for hecklers to disrupt speakers on the UC Davis campus at an event titled “Israeli Soldiers Speak Out.” It was reprehensible that one of these hecklers accused the speakers of being associated with rapists and murderers. Under the direction of Chancellor Katehi, campus officials dealt appropriately with this individual, moving him out of the room and barring reentry. But I want to make this clear: I condemn the actions of those who would disrupt this event. Attempting to shout down speakers is not protected speech. It is an action meant to deny others their right to free speech.

It was wrong for a vandal or vandals on the UC Riverside campus to deface the Israeli flag displayed by the Jewish student organization Hillel, scrawling the word “terrorists” across it. I applaud Chancellor White for his rapid and vigorous condemnation of this cowardly act. And I join him wholeheartedly in that condemnation. The chancellor was right to assign campus police to investigate.

Two years ago, at UC San Diego, it was African Americans who were vilified by words and images that mocked their heritage and who felt threatened by the hanging of a noose. Around the same time, derogatory and profane words were spray-painted across the entrance to the Lesbian Gay Bisexual Transgender Resource Center at UC Davis. Likewise, swastikas scrawled on campus walls or doors have made Jewish students feel unsafe.

Since then, among other initiatives, the system’s central office has worked with the campuses and various groups, including students, to revise policies on student conduct; the new provisions strengthen prohibitions on threatening conduct and acts motivated by bias, including religious bias. We also are working with the Museum of Tolerance and the Anti-Defamation League to improve campus climate for all students and to take full advantage of our marvelous diversity.

Still, despite diligent efforts, we cannot say – and, realistically, never will be able to say – that hateful incidents won’t occur in a community made up of 235,000 students and 185,000 employees. There inevitably will be speakers or forums that present ideas others will view as hateful and abhorrent. Hateful incidents will not be tolerated and I stand ready to condemn them whenever and wherever they occur, as should all members of the UC community.

As for incendiary speakers, we cannot as a society allow what we regard as vile speech to lead us to abandon the cherished value of free speech. But the same Constitution that permits some public figures to engage in hateful commentary also protects my right and duty – and your right and duty – to condemn these merchants of hatred when they come into our community. Again, the best remedy for bad speech is to surround it with good speech.

Finally, it is important that we keep our eyes on the prize. What we collectively are trying to preserve is a vibrant and vocal university community that is not afraid to explore or even argue about ideas, that is not afraid to make stands on controversial issues, that is not afraid of discourse, but is one that embraces the ethic of doing so in a spirit of respect and civility.

With our Chancellors, I remain committed to the principle of balancing protection of free speech and promoting strategies to foster an environment where all students, faculty, staff members and guests can feel safe and respected – no matter their individual characteristics or viewpoints.

Sincerely,

Mark G. Yudof
President

Music in the Rotunda

Wednesday, March 7th, 2012

UCLA Bruin Harmony

Friday, March 9
8 p.m.

Powell Library Rotunda

Founded in 2006, Bruin Harmony is UCLA’s all-male a cappella group. Following last spring’s debut, this is their second appearance in the Powell Library Building Rotunda. They founded the Los Angeles A Cappella Festival, appeared in the award-winning film The Social Network, and have twice won the UCLA Prytanean Award for the best a cappella entry in the UCLA Spring Sing. Admission is free, and no reservations are required.

The rotunda is on the second floor of the Powell Library Building, which is directly across from Royce Hall. Parking is $11; the closest parking is in structures four, two, or five. See the UCLA maps and directions page for more information.

 

Poetry Reading and Exhibit Opening

Monday, March 5th, 2012

Powell Library Rotunda

Al-Mutanabbi Street

Monday, March 5
7:30 p.m.

Known as “the street of booksellers,” al-Mutanabbi Street is a legendary locale in Baghdad, a winding lane filled with bookstores, outdoor book stalls, small presses, and cafes where books have been made, sold, and discussed for centuries. In March 2007 a massive car bomb targeted this historic heart of the city’s intellectual and literary community, leaving thirty dead and one hundred injured.

This event celebrates the opening of an exhibit of broadsides and artists’ books created by letter-press artists and writers around the world in response to the bombing. It will feature an exhibit tour led by Beau Beausoleil, the force behind the broadside project, and readings by writers including Dima Hilal, Jen Hofer, Elline Lipkin, Afaf Nash, Jim Natal, Aram Saroyan, Janet Sternburg, and Sholeh Wolpe.

The exhibit and event are co-sponsored by the UCLA Library, Center for Near Eastern Studies, and the Dean of Humanities Fund. Admission is free, and no reservations are required. The exhibit will remain on view through April 30.

The rotunda is on the second floor of the Powell Library Building, which is directly across from Royce Hall. Parking is $11; the closest parking is in structures four, two, or five. See the UCLA maps and directions page for more information.

Admission to the event is free, and seating is unreserved.