Archive for December, 2011

Have a non-greedy Holiday

Thursday, December 22nd, 2011

UCLA Today has just come out with a great ten questions with Diana Winston, director of mindfulness education at UCLA’s Mindful Awareness Research Center.

In this article she poses ideas that people tend to do during the holidays in the gift giving receiving mode that we sometimes get into during this stressful time of our city.

She welcomes this into her mind, but notices, but doesn’t subcumb to the desire. She practices what she preaches, even on her daughter. Who by the way is only getting “one,” special present this year. Wow, can you believe that?!

Click here to read this special article by Judy Lin courtesy of UCLA Today.

UCLA Libraries

Wednesday, December 21st, 2011

 UCLA campus libraries will be closed from Thursday, December 22, 2011, through Monday, January 2, 2012, as part of the campuswide Winter Holiday Closure.  Further details are available online.

Online Resources

The following online resources will be available for remote access.Note: users must access resources restricted to UCLA or UC students, faculty, and staff through the campus network, Bruin OnLine (BOL), or the BOL proxy server.

  • Melvyl: This UC-wide catalog will be accessible throughout the closure; however, requests for items from other campuses may not be processed between December 22 and January 2.
  • Databases
  • E-journals

Reference Assistance

Reference assistance by email or by telephone will be unavailable between December 22 and January 2. UCLA students, faculty, and staff who send email inquiries or leave telephone messages during the closure period will receive replies starting on January 3; queries will be answered in the order in which they were received.

Happy Holidays and Happy New Year from  Powell Library!

Amiri Baraka & Kellie Jones

Tuesday, December 20th, 2011

Sunday, January 8, 2012
2:00 pm – 4:00 pm,
UCLA Hammer Museum – Billy Wilder Theater

Now Dig This! curator Kellie Jones and her father—renowned poet, playwright, and activist Amiri Baraka—discuss their collaboration on Jones’s book EyeMinded: Living and Writing Contemporary Art, which investigates various perspectives on art making throughout different generations.

Jones is associate professor in the Department of Art History and Archaeology at Columbia University. Her writings have appeared in NKAArtforumFlash ArtAtlanticaThird Text and numerous catalogues.

Baraka is the author of more than 40 books of essays, poems, drama, and music history and criticism. The former Poet Laureate of New Jersey, he has received numerous honors including fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation and the National Endowment of the Arts, the PEN/Faulkner Award, and an Obie Award for his play Dutchman (1963). A book signing will follow the conversation. In conjunction with the exhibition Now Dig This! Art and Black Los Angeles 1960–1980.

Free and open to the public.

 

Creating a New Black Cinema

Friday, December 16th, 2011

‘Emma Mae’ (1976)

Friday, December 16, 2011
7:30 pm – 10:00 pm, UCLA Hammer Museum – Billy Wilder Theater

L.A. Rebellion: Creating a New Black Cinema – Film Series

This major film exhibition by the UCLA Film & Television Archive celebrates an historic artistic movement of Los Angeles-based African American and African filmmakers who met at UCLA from the 1960s to 1980s and worked to forge a cinema that would be responsive to black communities. The Archive will present more than 50 film and video works, most of which have never screened theatrically, many in new or restored prints, and often with the filmmaker present.

‘Emma Mae’ (1976): Emma Mae arrives in Los Angeles from Mississippi replete with rough edges, as well an exceptional ability to kick ass. Emma Mae’s plain looks and shy demeanor set her apart from supermama heroines of this “Blaxploitation” era (e.g., ‘Foxy Brown’, ‘Cleopatra Jones’). But when folks underestimate her, Emma Mae surprises everyone, including her no-good boyfriend Jesse, with her extraordinary physical and emotional strength.

Preceded by: ‘Bellydancing—A History & An Art’ (1979): Alicia Dhanifu, who appears in Jamaa Fanaka’s ‘Emma Mae’, constructs a rigorous history of belly dancing—its roots and history, forms and meanings.

Tickets: Advanced tickets: $10 online. In-person sales one hour before showtime: $9 general public; FREE to UCLA students with valid ID; $8 other students/seniors.

Jason Moran, Jason Moran, Jason Moran

Thursday, December 15th, 2011

Hammer Presents: Jason Moran

Thursday, December 15, 2011
7:00 pm – 9:00 pm, UCLA Hammer Museum – Billy Wilder Theater

2010 MacArthur Fellow Jason Moran is a pianist, composer and bandleader who mines a variety of musical styles to create adventurous, genre-crossing jazz performances. Moran marries established classical, blues and jazz techniques with the musical influences of his generation, including funk, hip-hop, and rock. His albums include ModernisticSame Mother, and Ten. The performance will be followed by a discussion with Guthrie Ramsey, professor of music at the University of Pennsylvania, exploring the theme of migration and music. In conjunction with the exhibition Now Dig This! Art and Black Los Angeles 1960–1980.

Free and open to the public.

College Library Makes the List

Thursday, December 15th, 2011

The 25 Most Beautiful College Libraries in the World

The college library, whether ornate or modern, digital or dusty, is in many ways the epicenter of the college experience — at least for some students. It is at once a shining emblem of vast, acquirable knowledge, a place for deep discussions and meetings of the mind, and of course, a big building full of books, which, as far as we’re concerned, is exciting enough. Colleges and universities are understandably quite proud of their libraries, which can be a selling point for prospective students and donating alumni alike, and they often become the most well-designed and beautifully adorned buildings on campus. To that end, and perhaps to inspire your studies a bit, we’ve collected a few of the most beautiful college and university libraries in the world, from Portugal to France to Boston. Did your alma mater’s library make the list? Or did we miss one of your favorites? Let us know in the comments.

Housed in the historic Powell Library building, the Powell (College) Library has been an inspiration for students since 1929, when the original 137,000-square-foot structure was built in 1929. One of the first two buildings on UCLA’s Westwood campus, Powell Library was constructed in an adaptation of the Lombardian type of Italian Romanesque architecture. Moorish touches were added to the design to reflect the extensive Spanish influence in the history of Southern California. Throughout the building many symbols of truth, wisdom, and knowledge can be found: the griffin, the caduceus, the serpent, the owl of wisdom, Alladin’s lamp, and the pine cone. Below the first landing on the main staircase is a mosaic which shows two men holding a book bearing the legend, from Cicero’s Pro Archia, “Haec studia adulescentiam alunt, senectutem oblectant…” (“These studies stimulate the young, divert the old.”)

Powell Library is named after Lawrence Clark Powell, who was UCLA’s University Librarian from 1944-1961.

L.A. Rebellion: Creating a New Black Cinema – Film Series

Tuesday, December 13th, 2011

‘Compensation’ (1999)

Wednesday, December 14, 2011
7:30 pm – 9:30 pm,
UCLA Hammer Museum – Billy Wilder Theater

This major film exhibition by the UCLA Film & Television Archive celebrates an historic artistic movement of Los Angeles-based African American and African filmmakers who met at UCLA from the 1960s to 1980s and worked to forge a cinema that would be responsive to black communities. The Archive will present more than 50 film and video works, most of which have never screened theatrically, many in new or restored prints, and often with the filmmaker present.

‘Compensation’ (1999): In two Chicago love stories, set a century apart, a deaf woman and a hearing man face the specter of death. They also confront intraracial differences across lines of gender, class, education and ability. Through innovative use of sign language and title cards evoking the silent film era, ‘Compensation’ is accessible to deaf and hearing audiences.

Preceded by: ‘Dark Exodus’ (1985): Visualizing the migration of African Americans from the rural South to the industrial North in sepia tones, Iverson White’s period film captures the atmosphere of early 20th century America.

Tickets: Advanced tickets: $10 online. In-person sales one hour before showtime: $9 general public; FREE to UCLA students with valid ID; $8 other students/seniors.

 

Research Library Exhibit

Tuesday, December 13th, 2011

Viewing Afghanistan: From Isolation to Interaction

November 14 through December 16

Illustrating the range of participants – both Afghan and non-Afghan – in the country’s modern history, the books, magazines, and papers on display, many quite rare, offer an overview of the Library’s rich holdings on Afghanistan and its global linkages in a wide range of languages. Presented in the East Exhibit Case, it is scheduled in conjunction with “Great Games? Afghan History through Afghan Eyes,” a conference organized by the UCLA Program on Central Asia.

Click here for the “Great Games? Afghan History through Afghan Eyes,” web site.

Arts Library Exhibit

Monday, December 12th, 2011

Architects’ Journeys: Selected Published Travel Sketchbooks
and Study Tour Drawings

Through December

To welcome back students who may have been studying abroad this summer, this exhibit showcases books from Arts Library collections that feature architects’ travel sketches and study tour drawings, including facsimile sketchbooks.

The UCLA Arts library is located in 1400 Public Affairs Building, North Campus.

The Hot Chocolate Nutcracker

Friday, December 9th, 2011

Debbie Allen Dance Academy

Saturday, December 10, 2011
1:00 pm – 3:00 pm, Royce – Auditorium

The Hot Chocolate Nutcracker, Debbie Allen’s updated take on the perennial Christmas classic, returns to Royce Hall for its second year. Includes an original score by Arturo Sandoval, Tena Clarke, Mariah Carey, Chau-Giang Thi Nguyen and James Ingram.

Open to the public. Refer to ticket purchase site for pricing details.

Click here for tickets.