Archive for the ‘Scholarly Communication’ Category

Celebrate Open Access Week with the Biomedical Library

Friday, October 12th, 2012

 

NIH Public Access Policy: How the Mandate Affects UCLA Researchers
Tuesday, October 23, from noon to 1 p.m.
UCLA Biomedical Library 4th Floor Classroom

If you receive funding from the National Institutes of Health (NIH), come learn what the NIH public access policy means for you. This class addresses questions such as: Who needs to comply with the policy? What is PubMed Central? Which submission methods apply to you? How do you cite PMCIDs in grant applications?

The focus of this course is to:

  • provide an introduction and overview of the NIH public access policy mandate
  • describe how it works and what you need to do to comply
  • engage in a discussion of the challenges and address your questions

Seating is limited; RSVP to biomed-ref@library.ucla.edu.

NIH Public Access Policy: How the Mandate Affects UCLA Researchers

Monday, June 4th, 2012

Part of the First Fridays Series at the UCLA Louise M. Darling Biomedical Library Classroom
Friday, July 13, from noon to 1 p.m.

If you receive funding from the National Institutes of Health (NIH), come learn what the NIH public access policy means for you. This class addresses questions such as: Who needs to comply with the policy? What is PubMed Central? Which submission methods apply to you? How do you cite PMCIDs in grant applications?

The focus of this course is to:

  • provide an introduction and overview of the NIH public access policy mandate
  • describe how it works and what you need to do to comply
  • engage in a discussion of the challenges and address your questions

Seating is limited; RSVP to biomed-ref@library.ucla.edu.
You can also find information about this event on Facebook.

White House Open Access Petition

Friday, May 25th, 2012

The Obama Administration has been actively considering the issue of public access to the results of federally funded research, with an inter-agency working group having recently completed a year-long examination of the issue. The administration is currently considering which policy actions are priorities to be acted upon before the elections this fall.

Currently, only the National Institutes of Health has a public access policy.  To demonstrate the depth and breadth of support for expanding this to all federal science agencies, a coalition of public access advocates has created a petition on the White House’s “We the People” site.  If the petition attracts 25,000 signatures within thirty days, it will be reviewed by White House staff and considered for action.

To sign the petition, go to https://wwws.whitehouse.gov/petitions.  Qualified signers must be at least thirteen years old and have a valid email address.

Thank you very much for supporting the crucial effort to expand access to the results of federally funded research.

 

Introducing the Code of Best Practices Now Up on YouTube

Friday, February 24th, 2012

“Introducing the Code of Best Practices in Fair Use for Academic and Research Libraries” is now posted to UCLA’s YouTube channel

Part 1: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9jrAMR94mcQ

Part 2: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tMQBAdpZjzw

More than 125 people attended this kick-off session on February 3 at the UCLA Library.  Presented by Peter Jaszi, Professor of Law, American University Washington College of Law and Brandon Butler, Director of Public Policy Initiatives, Association of Research Libraries, the presentation provides a context and background for the Code and outlines the eight principles each with described with limitations and enhancements.

The code can be accessed at:  http://www.arl.org/bm~doc/arl_csm_fairusereport.pdf

<reposted from the UCLA University Librarian’s blog>

CITE IT RIGHT: Citing Email and Email List-serve Messages and Personal Communications

Monday, November 7th, 2011

This is the eleventh and final installment in a series of blog posts about AMA style, which is designed to impart the basic rules for AMA citation style for different types of sources. This week our focus is the different AMA styles for email and email Listserve messages and personal communications. To learn more about AMA style and this blog series, please see the first post.

Citing Email and Email List-serve Messages

Email in running text:

Format:

In running text after the sentence quoted (name of author of email, their highest degree, e-mail communication, date).

Example:

There have been no subsequent reports of toxic reactions in the exposed groups (Mary Jones, MD, e-mail communication, March 29, 2004).

Email List-serve message in running text:

Format:

Sentence from running text (name of author of email, their highest degree, name of list-serve, date).

Example:

The AIDS Committee of AIDSinfo is releasing new information on AIDS treatments (Dr. Smith, MD, AIDSinfo At-a-Glance, November 4, 2011).

Email list-serve thread cited in running text:

Format:

Title. (Name of list-serve) listserve discussion. Date. URL. Accessed date.

Example:

How to prepare for earthquakes. DISASTR-OUTREACH-LIB listserve discussion. November 1-3, 2011. http://sis.nlm.nih.gov/dimrc/dimrclistserv.html. Accessed November 4, 2011.

Please see AMA Manual of Style 3.15.9 for further details and examples.

Citing Personal Communications

Personal communications should not be included in the list of references. 

Instead, cite within text always giving the date; whether the communication was oral or in writing; and the person’s highest degree or source of authority, as follows:

Format:

In a conversation with Name, MD* (date)…

According to a letter from Name, MD* in date…

Example:

In a conversation with Dr. Jones, MD (November 3, 2011)…

According to the pharmacist (L.M. James, oral communication, October 30, 2011), the drug will be available by prescription next year.

 *Some journals like JAMA require written permission from the person quoted when using their unpublished communications.

See AMA Manual of Style 3.13.9 for further details and examples.

<submitted by Catherine Madsen>

CITE IT RIGHT: Citing Software or Software Manuals, Databases and Legal References

Wednesday, November 2nd, 2011

This is the tenth in a series of blog posts about AMA style, which is designed to impart the basic rules for AMA citation style for different types of sources. This week our focus is the different AMA styles for citing software or software manuals, databases and legal references. To learn more about AMA style and this blog series, please see the first post.

Citing Software (Online) or Software Manuals (Print)

For software online:

Format:

Name of Computer Program [computer program]. Version if available. Location of publisher (City, State or City, Country): Publisher Name; date (year).

Example:

Java for Bioinformatics and Biomedical Applications [computer program]. New York, NY: Springer; 2007.

See AMA Manual of Style 3.15.6 for more information and examples.

For print software manuals cite as for books in print:

Format:

Author(s) (Last name, first and middle initials). Title. Location of publisher (City, State or City, Country): Publisher Name; date (year).

Example:

Peters, P.J. Biostatistical Programs in BASIC Language for Time-Shared Computers.  Washington, D.C.: Smithsonian Institution Press; 1971.

See AMA Manual of Style 3.15.7 for more information and examples.

Citing Online Databases

Format:

Author(s) (Last name, first and middle initials). Title of database. Location of publisher (City, State or City, Country): Publisher Name; date (year of publication). URL.  (Updated date if available). Accessed date.

Example:

Sloan, A. P. and Kettering, C.F. Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center Database. New York, NY: Sloan-Kettering Institute; 2011. http://www.mskcc.org/mskcc/html/457.cfmAccessed October 20, 2011.

See AMA Manual of Style 3.15.8 for more information and examples.

Citing Legal References Online and in Print

Legal citation formats are very complex so please refer to the AMA Manual of Style 3.16 for specific rules for different sources such as court cases, law journals and other legislative materials as well a link The Bluebook: A Uniform System of Citation for complete details including citation styles in different jurisdictions.

Use the same format for both print and online with the addition of the URL and accessed date for the online format.

Check this blog post next week for the correct AMA citation style for email or List-serve messages and personal communications.

<submitted by Catherine Madsen>

 

CITE IT RIGHT: Citing Unpublished Materials and Online Conferences or Presentations

Wednesday, October 26th, 2011

This is the ninth in a series of blog posts about AMA style, which is designed to impart the basic rules for AMA citation style for different types of sources. This week our focus is the different AMA styles for citing unpublished materials and online conferences or presentations. To learn more about AMA style and this blog series, please see the first post.

Citing Unpublished Materials

At meetings, oral or poster presentations:

Format:

Author(s) (Last name, first and middle initials). Title of paper.  Paper presented at: Name of meeting; Date (Month, Year); Location (City, State or City, Country).

Example:

American Academy of Physical Education. Exercise and health: Fifty-fourth Annual Meeting. Paper presented at: 54th American Academy of Physical Education Meeting; April 6-7, 1983; Minneapolis, Minnesota.*

*(This work has since been published but this is how it would have been cited in 1983 before it was published.)

Accepted by Publisher but not yet published:

Format:

For journal articles:

Author(s) (Last name, first and middle initials). Title. Journal Name. In press.

or for books:

Author(s) (Last name, first and middle initials). Title. Location of publication: publisher. In press.

Example:

Hoffman RJ, Wang VJ, Scarfone R.  Fleisher & Ludwig’s 5-minute pediatric emergency medicine consult. Philadelphia, PA: Wolters Kluwer Health/Lippincott Williams & Wilkins. In press.

*(This work has since been published but this is how it would have been cited before it was published.)

See AMA Manual of Style for further details and examples.

Citing Online Conferences and Presentations

These are similar to above unpublished materials “presented at” references plus the URL and Accessed date:

Format:

Author(s) (Last name, first and middle initials). Title of paper.  Paper presented at: Name of meeting; Date (Month, Year); Location (City, State or City, Country). URL. Accessed date.

Example:

Beckerman B, Alley G.  Image informatics and analytics in biomedicine. Paper presented at: Biomedical Sciences and Engineering Conference; March 15-17, 2011; Knoxville, Tennessee. http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/xpl/mostRecentIssue.jsp?punumber=5783452. Accessed October 13, 2011.

See AMA Manual of Style for further details and examples.

Check this blog post next week for the correct AMA citation style for software or software manuals, databases and legal references.

<submitted by Catherine Madsen>

 

 

 

CITE IT RIGHT: Citing Serial Publications; Theses and Dissertations; and Secondary Citations

Tuesday, October 18th, 2011

This is the eighth in a series of blog posts about AMA style, which is designed to impart the basic rules for AMA citation style for different types of sources. This week our focus is the different AMA styles for citing serial publications; theses and dissertations; and secondary citations or quotations. To learn more about AMA style and this blog series, please see the first post.

(more…)

CITE IT RIGHT: Citing Government Publications

Friday, October 7th, 2011

This is the seventh in a series of blog posts about AMA style, which is designed to impart the basic rules for AMA citation style for different types of sources. This week our focus is the different AMA styles for citing government publications in print and online. To learn more about AMA style and this blog series, please see the first post.

(more…)

CITE IT RIGHT: Citing Media

Friday, September 30th, 2011

This is the sixth in a series of blog posts about AMA style, which is designed to impart the basic rules for AMA citation style for different types of sources. This week our focus is the different AMA styles for citing transcripts of radio and TV programs as well as audiotapes, videotapes and DVD recordings. To learn more about AMA style and this blog series, please see the first post.

Citing Audiotapes, Videotapes and DVDs

Format:

Author (Last name, first and middle initials) or host if no author. Title(in italics, capitalize main words) [media format such as DVD etc.]. Location of publication (city, state; city, country): Publisher or Distributor; date.

Example:

Harrison, G., Benedict, J. The History of Science: What is the Secret of Life? [DVD] New York, NY: Films for the Humanities & Sciences; 2011.

Citing a Transcript for a Radio or TV Program

Format:

Title of program (capitalize first word and proper names only) [transcript]. Name of TV or radio show (in italics). Name of TV or radio station. Date (Month date, year).

Example:

SGMD special edition: The frontlines of famine [transcript]. Sanjay Gupta MD. CNN television. August 13, 2011.

See AMA Manual of Style online for further information and examples.

Check this blog next week for the correct AMA citation style for government publications both online and in print.

<submitted by Catherine Madsen>