Archive for the ‘Exhibits’ Category

Labs on the Go: Scientific Tools for Collecting Empire, 1600 – Present

Wednesday, July 31st, 2013

Frontispiece portrait of the author from Georg Eberhard Rumpf’s Het amboinsch kruid-boek (Herbarium Amboinense), 1750 (Biomed * QK R937h 1750 v.1 RARE)

An undergraduate student-curated exhibition of scientific objects from UCLA Library Special Collections continues through September in two locations on campus: Louise M. Darling Biomedical Library (4th floor) and Powell Library Building Rotunda (2nd floor).

Marissa Petrou, the History of Science doctoral student whose GE Cluster students created the project from concept to completion, provided an introduction to the exhibit, which we share here with her permission: (more…)

The Hippocratic Oaths … Plural

Tuesday, June 4th, 2013

Portrait medal of HippocratesOn Friday, May 31st, students of the David Geffen School of Medicine Class of 2013 received their degrees and hoods, after which Dean/Vice Chancellor A. Eugene Washington administered the Hippocratic Oath.

But which “Hippocratic Oath”?

The pledge to practice medicine conscientiously and honorably comes in many varieties.  The current UCLA oath was adapted by now-Dean Emeritus Sherman Mellinkoff and differs significantly from the version recited by the first graduating class in 1955, for example.

A mini-exhibit by History & Special Collections for the Sciences, in the Biomedical Library (1st floor, in the lobby), includes six-century old texts, commencement programs, an academic medical badge presented by Nicholas II of Russia to a new doctor in 1915, portrait medals, and a leaf from “the” Hippocratic tree at Kos, to briefly illustrate the history of the Hippocratic Oaths … plural.

The Hippocratic Oaths … Plural (Six Centuries of Texts, Six Decades of Commencements) is on view through June 23rd.

[The portrait medal of Hippocrates (copper, 95 mm), seen above, was designed by Jacques Devigne for the Paris Mint in 1983. It is Sonnenschein #0650 in the Ralph R. and Patricia N. Sonnenschein Collection of Medical and Scientific Portrait and Commemorative Medals.]

 

Russell Johnson
History & Special Collections for the Sciences
UCLA Library Special Collections

Smoking in the Library, the Lab, the Cafeteria … Before the UCLA Tobacco-Free Campus

Friday, May 10th, 2013

MEDUCLA 1958 (UCLA School of Medicine student yearbook)

On Earth Day, April 22nd, the whole of UCLA joined the hospitals and health science campuses to become tobacco- and smoke-free environments, according to an announcement from the UCLA Newsroom.

A mini-exhibit in History & Special Collections for the Sciences, in the Biomedical Library (4th floor, up the ramp from Stack level 9), uses yearbooks, archival photos, postcards, and advertisements to show the other side of the coin, when smoking and tobacco use were taken for granted in surprising (to us) circumstances.

UCLA’s Tobacco-Free Campus [facebook page]

UCLA Tobacco-Free Task Force

UCLA’s Tobacco-Free Policy

UCLA Policy 810: Tobacco-Free Environment

Russell Johnson
History & Special Collections for the Sciences
UCLA Library Special Collections

GIANTmicrobes at the Biomedical Library

Friday, December 7th, 2012

 

History & Special Collections for the Sciences has purchased each new release of GIANTmicrobes® since 2004 and recently passed the century mark. 108 “plush stuffed-animal microbes [realia]” currently are on display in a case in the lobby of the Biomedical Library.

GIANTmicrobes are made to look like bacteria, blood cells, viruses, and other microbes and critters magnified up to a million times, but in plush fabric with added eyes. Each toy is accompanied by explanatory text on a hangtag card with a color illustration of the actual microbe on which the toy is based.

The Library uses GIANTmicrobes in exhibits and classes alongside rare books and manuscripts on related subjects, from bed bugs to cholera to typhoid fever. We are one of a very few libraries which are cataloging and preserving the educational toys for future generations, so that in 50 or 100 years researchers and visitors may come across a rack of carefully-stored “plush stuffed-animal microbes” and wonder, “what the heck are …”

(Image from <http://www.giantmicrobes.com> is reproduced with permission of the company.)

Russell Johnson
History & Special Collections for the Sciences
UCLA Library Special Collections

Public Science: Peepshows, Caskets, and Microscopes

Monday, July 16th, 2012

An undergraduate student-curated exhibition of scientific objects from UCLA Library Special Collections continues through September in three locations on campus: Biomedical Library (4th floor), Powell Library Building Rotunda, and Department of Special Collections (A-level, Young Research Library).

Marissa Petrou, the History of Science doctoral student whose GE Cluster seminar students created the project from concept to completion, provided an introduction to the exhibit, which we share here with her permission:

Peepshows, caskets, and microscopes all are things found in vaults and back-room storage areas in UCLA Library Special Collections that have a wealth of historical value. Yet the lives of these objects extend beyond the Library.

(more…)

In the News: Maurice Sendak (1928-2012) and Atomics for the Millions

Friday, June 15th, 2012

A mini-exhibit of reproductions of the late Where the Wild Things Are children’s book author/artist Maurice Sendak’s first illustrations in a mass-market  publication, Atomics for the Millions, is on display in the Science and Engineering Library (SEL, 8270 Boelter Hall) this month.

Sendak’s high school physics teacher, Hyman Ruchlis, co-authored the book in 1947 with Maxwell Leigh Eidenhoff, who had been a research group supervisor of Manhattan Project laboratories at Columbia University and Chicago University. Atomics was pitched as an “amazingly clear and non-technical book [that] actually enables the reader to understand the basic principles behind the development of atomic energy – - without any previous scientific or mathematical training.”

Peter D. Sieruta’s blog, Collecting Children’s Books, describes the origins and contents of this early popular-press science book, and how Ruchlis recruited Sendak to illustrate it.

Since Sendak’s death last month, bloggers have posted accounts of earlier appearances of Sendak illustrations in high school and other local Brooklyn, New York publications.

SEL is displaying UCLA’s two copies of the first edition of Atomics for the Millions: a circulating, library cloth-bound copy, and a “special collections” copy with the elusive and sought-after illustrated dustjacket. The paper in both copies has a slightly-browned but still very serviceable appearance because, as the back of the title page notes, “the quality of the materials used in the manufacture of this book is governed by continued postwar shortages.”

Russell Johnson
History & Special Collections for the Sciences
UCLA Library Special Collections

In the News: The Transit of Venus … 1769 edition

Monday, June 4th, 2012

UCLA astronomers invite the public to join them at the head of Janss Steps on Tuesday, June 5, from 3:06 pm until sunset, to safely use their filter-equipped telescopes to watch Venus cross the face of the Sun.

Library Special Collections will bring a rolling exhibit case to join part of the festivities (3:00-4:30pm) in order to show half a dozen reports from an earlier Transit of Venus … the renowned 1769 event for which scientific teams were sent worldwide to make observations. We will have a  paper from Lt. (later Captain) James Cook’s voyage on the Endeavour to the south Pacific Ocean, Jean-Baptiste Chappe d’Auteroche’s posthumous report from Baja California, and James Ferguson’s 1769 astronomy textbook “for young gentlemen and ladies.”

For more about the history of the Transit of Venus, visit NASA’s website for the 2012 event.

Please be sure to read the advisory on the UCLA Planets website about viewing the Transit of Venus phenomenon ONLY with proper protection!

Russell Johnson
History & Special Collections for the Sciences
UCLA Library Special Collections

Now Playing at a Theatre Near You: Polly the Dodo in The Pirates!

Thursday, May 17th, 2012

“Dodo from W.J. Broderip’s 1862 report in Transactions of the Zoological Society of London”

One of the lead characters in Aardman Animations’ new 3D adventure flick, The Pirates! Band of Misfits, is Pirate Captain’s apparently not-extinct ornithological companion, Polly the Dodo.

For one week only (to limit light exposure on hand-colored and color-printed illustrations), the Biomedical Library is exhibiting a treasure trove of two dimensional antiquarian bird booty about Didus ineptus (now Raphus cucullatus), the Dodo.

The mini-exhibit on the Louise M. Darling Biomedical Library’s first and fourth floors is part of an ongoing series, In the News (aka Now Playing, for film tie-ins), which relates items in the Library’s historical and special collections to current news stories.

Russell Johnson
History & Special Collections for the Sciences
UCLA Library Special Collections

Changing the Face of Medicine

Thursday, March 22nd, 2012

You may have noticed the travelling exhibit in the Biomedical Library research commons as you were studying for finals. Check it out through April 22. Also, stay tuned for more information on the Voices: Perspectives on Women in Medicine panel featuring our very own UCLA heroines during lunch time on April 4, 2012. Light refreshments will be served.

The online exhibit features many University of California women in medicine.
Search for them on the National Library of Medicine-sponsored website by clicking on “Physicians” then holding your CTRL or Command keyboard key and clicking on the various UC schools. Click on “Search” and you’re ready to explore the great contributions of these pioneering women.

<submitted by Monica Garcia>

Elmer Belt, Leonardo da Vinci, Earl Warren, and the UCLA School of Medicine

Friday, November 18th, 2011

In 1961, Los Angeles urologist, bibliophile, and UCLA School of Medicine mover-and-shaker Dr. Elmer Belt (1893-1980) donated to UCLA his magnificent collection of books and  materials about Leonardo da Vinci and the Italian Renaissance.  Elmer Belt, Collector of Ideas, a fiftieth anniversary tribute to the collector and his Elmer Belt Library of Vinciana, is on display in the lobby gallery of the Department of Special Collections (Charles E. Young Library, A-level) through January 6.

Elmer Belt, M.D. (1893-1980) was one of a growing number of local boosters who wanted to see UCLA form a medical school, after it moved to the Westwood campus and began granting graduate degrees. He reported meeting with continued resistance from Robert Gordon Sproul, president of the University of California from 1930 to 1958.  A sea-change came when Belt treated Governor Earl Warren as a patient. After hearing an impassioned pitch in the Belt Urological Group’s consultation offices, Warren took out his notebook and wrote his own prescription to his doctor:

“He said, ‘Now, there are ten things you have to do.’ So he wrote down one to ten on this sheet of paper, and he wrote after each one of them what he wanted me to do. The first was to select an assemblyman to introduce the [medical school appropriations] bill, ‘one that you can depend on.’ And the last was, ‘Come and stand behind me when I sign this.’” (Quotation from Surgeon and Bibliophile, Esther de Vécsey’s 1974-75 oral history interview with Dr. Belt.)

A black and white version of the official photograph, above, appeared in the Los Angeles Times on 20 February 1946 with the caption: “Gov. Warren signs bill providing $7,000,000 for medical school at Los Angeles campus of University of California. Looking on, from left, Speaker [Charles] Lyon of State Assembly; Dr. Elmer Belt of Los Angeles; James Corley, controller of the University; Assemblyman Phil Davis of Westwood, where campus is located; and State Sen. [Jack] Tunney.”

The newspaper quoted Governor Warren: “I don’t know of any appropriation bill before me that would give me more satisfaction to sign than this one. … I believe we can do as much good for the people of the State in this manner as any way of spending the money.”

Now known as the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, the medical school opened its doors to classes in 1951 and is celebrating its 60th anniversary this year.

 <submitted by Russell Johnson, History & Special Collections for the Sciences>