Archive for October, 2011

CITE IT RIGHT: Citing Unpublished Materials and Online Conferences or Presentations

Wednesday, October 26th, 2011

This is the ninth in a series of blog posts about AMA style, which is designed to impart the basic rules for AMA citation style for different types of sources. This week our focus is the different AMA styles for citing unpublished materials and online conferences or presentations. To learn more about AMA style and this blog series, please see the first post.

Citing Unpublished Materials

At meetings, oral or poster presentations:

Format:

Author(s) (Last name, first and middle initials). Title of paper.  Paper presented at: Name of meeting; Date (Month, Year); Location (City, State or City, Country).

Example:

American Academy of Physical Education. Exercise and health: Fifty-fourth Annual Meeting. Paper presented at: 54th American Academy of Physical Education Meeting; April 6-7, 1983; Minneapolis, Minnesota.*

*(This work has since been published but this is how it would have been cited in 1983 before it was published.)

Accepted by Publisher but not yet published:

Format:

For journal articles:

Author(s) (Last name, first and middle initials). Title. Journal Name. In press.

or for books:

Author(s) (Last name, first and middle initials). Title. Location of publication: publisher. In press.

Example:

Hoffman RJ, Wang VJ, Scarfone R.  Fleisher & Ludwig’s 5-minute pediatric emergency medicine consult. Philadelphia, PA: Wolters Kluwer Health/Lippincott Williams & Wilkins. In press.

*(This work has since been published but this is how it would have been cited before it was published.)

See AMA Manual of Style for further details and examples.

Citing Online Conferences and Presentations

These are similar to above unpublished materials “presented at” references plus the URL and Accessed date:

Format:

Author(s) (Last name, first and middle initials). Title of paper.  Paper presented at: Name of meeting; Date (Month, Year); Location (City, State or City, Country). URL. Accessed date.

Example:

Beckerman B, Alley G.  Image informatics and analytics in biomedicine. Paper presented at: Biomedical Sciences and Engineering Conference; March 15-17, 2011; Knoxville, Tennessee. http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/xpl/mostRecentIssue.jsp?punumber=5783452. Accessed October 13, 2011.

See AMA Manual of Style for further details and examples.

Check this blog post next week for the correct AMA citation style for software or software manuals, databases and legal references.

<submitted by Catherine Madsen>

 

 

 

Biomedical Library Welcomes New Librarian!

Monday, October 24th, 2011

I’m Lisa Federer, the newest Health and Life Sciences Librarian in the Research, Instruction, and Collection Services (RICS) division of the Louise M. Darling Biomedical Library.  You may recognize me from the Library’s reference desk, where I previously worked as a Public Service Assistant during my studies in UCLA’s Department of Information Studies.  I graduated with a Master’s in Library and Information Studies this spring, and am very pleased to be staying here at UCLA.  Before coming to UCLA, I was an adjunct instructor of English at Northlake College and the University of North Texas, where I also received an MA in English and BAs in English and French.

I currently serve as the liaison to the School of Public Health and am a member of the School of Medicine liaison team.  Professionally, I’m interested in data management and curation, instructional design, supporting evidence-based practice, and electronic health records.

When I’m not in the Library, you might find me zipping around Los Angeles on my vintage-style, baby blue scooter (wave if you see me!) or frequenting yarn stores to feed my knitting addiction.  I also spend my free time cooking, baking, playing the piano, and, like most librarians, reading.

Instruction Materials for LS10H: Research Training in Genes, Genetics, and Genomics

Friday, October 21st, 2011

 

 

 

 

 

 

Below are links to the materials for the LS 10H: Research Training in Genes, Genetics, and Genomics library instruction session to be held on October 21, 2011 from 2 – 3:30 p.m. in the Biomedical Library Classroom (12-077X CHS).

Important links:

<submitted by Lisa Federer>

Searching PubMed: Advanced Search and Limits

Tuesday, October 18th, 2011

This is the second in a series of posts on techniques for searching PubMed. In the first post we discussed what happens when you do a basic search of PubMed. This post is about the advanced search and limits options, and future posts will get into other options, such as searching MeSH, subsets, and filters.

The fields mentioned in the last PubMed post (MeSH terms, all fields, and author) aren’t the only field searching options. There are many others you can search, and there’s no need to memorize them—they’re all in the search builder, which you can find by clicking on advanced search under the search bar. If you want to make your search more specific, advanced search is one place to start.

Advanced Search:

Advanced search allows you to build a more detailed, specific search by letting you choose which fields to search for each term you enter, such as date, MeSH major topic, MeSH subheading, MeSH term (I’ll explain MeSH in the next post), author, investigator, grant number, publication type, and publisher, among many other things. To use advanced search, first select a field, then add a term into the search builder bar, choose and, or, or not, and click Add to search box. You can keep adding things to the search box in the same way.

Note that there are several different date fields for searching; make sure you choose the right one. It will ask you to specify a range of dates. Enter dates as year/month/day (e.g. 2007/07/30); month and day are not required.

If you’ve performed a search that, in hindsight, you think would be an awesome search if it only had a couple more things added on, don’t worry! PubMed will save your searches for up to 8 hours; they’re listed underneath the search builder in advanced search. You can add one to the search box by either clicking on a number or typing it manually into the search box with # (e.g. #3) and keep adding to it. If you really like a search, you can also save it to your MyNCBI account.

Limits:

If you’re getting too many results, or if all the results you’re getting are in the wrong language, are all clinical trials when you need reviews, or are otherwise not the type of article you’re looking for, you can go to the limits page and set limits to get only the kind of articles you want. The link to limits is right next to advanced search.

Limits also includes date limits, age groups, and journal subsets for specific areas (such as nursing, dentistry, etc). It’s a good place to look around on your own to get exactly what you want. The only thing we don’t recommend is selecting links to full text or links to free full text under the Text Options box, because they do not check for availability at UCLA, so they may skip articles UCLA does have.

PubMed keeps your limits on until you turn them off. If you’re having trouble with your searching or are using a shared  computer, check for the Limits Activated warning under the search bar.

<submitted by Vicki Burchfield>

CITE IT RIGHT: Citing Serial Publications; Theses and Dissertations; and Secondary Citations

Tuesday, October 18th, 2011

This is the eighth in a series of blog posts about AMA style, which is designed to impart the basic rules for AMA citation style for different types of sources. This week our focus is the different AMA styles for citing serial publications; theses and dissertations; and secondary citations or quotations. To learn more about AMA style and this blog series, please see the first post.

(more…)

In the News: Hot Enough for You?

Thursday, October 13th, 2011

 

The Story of Air Conditioning, a fact-filled 16-page pamphlet distributed by the Air Conditioning and Refrigeration Machinery Association sometime between 1940 and 1953, is available for reading at History & Special Collections for the Sciences on the 4th floor of the Biomedical Library. It also is online at: The Story of Air Conditioning.

This recent acquisition—the only copy now held by a library, and found for us by West Sand Lake, New York-based ephemera dealer aGatherin’—uses the characters Tempy (temperature), Drippy (humidity), Stirry (air circulation), and Dusty (cleanliness) to answer the question, “Did you ever wonder why you are so much more comfortable in air conditioned surroundings?” [Italics are theirs.]  The pamphlet is wittily illustrated by John Groth, who was the art editor of Esquire in the 1930s and combat correspondent and artist for the Chicago Sun during World War II.

<submitted by Russell Johnson>

Info on the Go: Accessing Library Resources on Your Mobile Device

Tuesday, October 11th, 2011

You probably already knew that you can access all of your favorite Library resources from your home computer by setting up off-campus access, but did you know that you can also use your PDA or mobile device to access many of these resources?  Get the info you need wherever you are, from sources like:

  • PubMed
  • UpToDate
  • VisualDX
  • Micromedex
  • and more!

Mobile-enhanced versions of some sites are available, with a cleaner look and feel to make it easier to view content on your device.  Other resources require downloading an app; most are free.  Some sites may require a password, while others must be accessed after setting your device up for the Bruin Online VPN.  Once you’ve completed set up, you’ll be able to get the same full-text access that you get on your computer.

For more information about resources that are available on mobile devices, see the PDA Resources list from the Library’s Medicine Subject Guide.  Have a favorite mobile app or website that you don’t see on the list?  We want to hear about it!  Leave us a comment or email us, and we’ll add it to the list.

<submitted by Lisa Federer>

Instruction Materials for CHS 132: Health, Disease, and Health Services in Latin America

Tuesday, October 11th, 2011

Below are links to the materials for the CHS 132: Health, Disease, and Health Services in Latin America library instruction session to be held on October 11, 2011 from 11:30 a.m. – 12:50 p.m. in the Biomedical Library Classroom (12-077X CHS).

Important links:

<submitted by Lisa Federer>

CITE IT RIGHT: Citing Government Publications

Friday, October 7th, 2011

This is the seventh in a series of blog posts about AMA style, which is designed to impart the basic rules for AMA citation style for different types of sources. This week our focus is the different AMA styles for citing government publications in print and online. To learn more about AMA style and this blog series, please see the first post.

(more…)

Instruction Materials for Health Services 225A

Thursday, October 6th, 2011

Below are links to the materials for the Health Services 225A library instruction session to be held on October 6, 2011 from 3 – 5 p.m. and October 7, 2011 from 10 a.m. – noon in the Biomed Library Classroom.

Important links:

<submitted by Lisa Federer>