Archive for November, 2009

New: Smithsonian Collections Search Center

Thursday, November 19th, 2009

The Smithsonian Libraries, Archives and Museums have worked together and created the Collections Search Center (http://collections.si.edu), a one-stop-searching center for the public for Smithsonian Institution collections.  This fast growing Collections Search Center currently contains 2.3 million records with 280,000 online media such as images, sound files, videos, and online collections. 

Collections are contributed by:

  • Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery
  • Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden
  • National Air and Space Museum
  • National Museum of American Indians
  • National Museum of Natural History
  • National Portrait Gallery
  • National Postal Museum
  • Smithsonian American Art Museum
  • Archives at the National Museum of the American Indian
  • Archives Center at National Museum of American History
  • Archives of American Art
  • Archives of American Gardens
  • Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
  • Human Studies Film Archives
  • National Air and Space Museum Archives Division
  • National Anthropological Archives
  • Smithsonian American Art Museum Photo Archives
  • Smithsonian Center for Education and Museum Studies
  • Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage
  • Smithsonian Institution Archives
  • Smithsonian Institution Libraries
  • Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory – Chandra X-ray Observatory

SAHARA Images Added to ARTstor Digital Library

Wednesday, November 4th, 2009

The Society of Architectural Historians announced that on November 4, 2009, 10,000 digital photographs and QTVRs from the SAHARA Editors’ Choice collection will be integrated into the ARTstor Digital Library.  For institutions that subscribe to ARTstor (such as the University of California), this will enrich the substantial architecture holdings already in the ARTstor Digital Library and provide seamless access to both collections.   All photographs and QTVRs contributed to SAHARA still will be available to Society of Architectural Historians members through the SAHARA site.

SAHARA is a digital image archive developed by the Society of Architectural Historians in collaboration with ARTstor to allow SAH members either to upload their own digital photographs and QTVR panoramas to a shared online archive or to download images from the archive for teaching and research.  The SAHARA collection is being built for all who study, interpret, photograph, design and preserve the built environment worldwide.

Now on View in the Arts Library

Tuesday, November 3rd, 2009

The Magic Lantern!
From Victorian Vision To Modern Media

From the Collection of UCLA Design | Media Arts Professor Erkki Huhtamo

October 21 – December 11, 2009

Prof. Erkki Huhtamo with Magic Langern

The magic lantern played an important role in visual education and entertainment for centuries. Introduced soon after the mid-seventeenth century, it became a staple of the curiosity cabinets of savants and was brought to the “common people” by itinerant showmen. In the nineteenth century the magic lantern show developed into a specialized profession and big business, and countless magic lanterns and slides were produced both for professional and domestic use.

Featuring magic lanterns, lantern slides, and other related objects from the extensive private collection of UCLA Design | Media Arts Professor Erkki Huhtamo, this exhibit demonstrates how the magic lantern show, typical of the Victorian era, opened ways for modern society and culture as well.

In connection with the exhibit, the Department of Design | Media Arts will present a Halloween Magic Lantern Show in the EDA auditorium in the Broad Art Center on Thursday, October 29, at 6 p.m. It will be presented by the American Magic Lantern Theater of Connecticut, the only professional group giving authentic magic lantern shows in the United States. Admission is free, and no reservations are required; seating is on a first-come basis.